Friday, 21 July 2017

My Communications Internship at the Bat Conservation Trust

I have always had a keen interest in nature and wildlife. Growing up my interest in the beauty of our natural landscape, its wildlife and its preservation has continued to grow. I spent a great deal of time at university studying and researching the effects of conservation efforts in the United States and in the UK. During my final year at university I looked into the effects of increased population and over development in the USA during the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries. I focused on the consequences met such as the sudden decreased population of animals like the Grey Wolf and American Bison. In addition I studied individuals that provoked the preservation of a dying environment such as John Muir and Theodore Roosevelt. My hope is to continue my passion for the protection of our environment by developing and shaping my career through charities such at BCT.

Although I was unable to find the perfect role within a conservation charity after graduating, I was not deterred. I decided to look into internships within conservation organisations (I hadn’t previously ventured down the internship pathway). I stumbled across BCT’s Communications Internship and decided the role sounded fantastic – a communications role that dabbled in events and fundraising, and within conservation - Perfect! After applying so eagerly (approximately 3 weeks before the application deadline) and not hearing anything back since the confirmation reply email, I had come to the conclusion that sadly nothing was to come of it, until I had a sudden call offering an interview! I was ecstatic! This was my big break, to get a foot in the door, and a step in the right direction. After meeting the team and finding out more about the organisation I was hooked, and when, to my surprise, they offered me the role I couldn’t believe it, I said yes, of course!

The long-eared bats I met during my visit to Jenny Clark's Bat Hospital
I found out straight away that the BCT team were amazing, full of kind, intelligent people dedicated and passionate about protecting bats. The work they do here is invaluable to the protection of bats. From the National Bat Monitoring Programme to the Helpline, Mitigation to Communications, together they inform and educate so many on the importance of bat conservation. I have met some incredibly influential bat enthusiasts who have dedicated so much of their lives to protecting this fascinating species.

A highlight of my time at BCT has to be my visit to Jenny Clarks bat hospital. We met a variety of bat species including all three Pipistrelles: Common, Soprano and Nathusius, Serotine, Noctule, grey and brown Long Eared, Natterers, Brandts, Whiskered, Daubentons and Bechsteins. It was also where I discovered how incredibly beautiful the brown and grey long eared bats were! Jenny is an incredibly devoted woman, whose passion and dedication is outstanding.

Part of BCT's exhibition at Gardener's World Live
Another highlight of my time at BCT was definitely Gardeners World Live. Not only did I get to meet more dedicated bat enthusiasts who volunteered with us, I also aided in spreading the good word of bats and how important they are to the environment. It was incredible to see how many people were unaware of the importance of bats, but how many of them were truly interested in making a difference to our environment by encouraging bats into their gardens. It was a brilliant whirl wind experience and one I won’t forget!


I have learnt so much in the past 3 months at BCT. I have gained so much experience from working with such a dedicated team. I can safely say that I have thoroughly enjoyed my time here and hope that our paths cross again in the future!



Emma Cross

Thursday, 6 July 2017

Monitoring Bats – An Exciting Opportunity


Spring has fully arrived and I’m sure you are enjoying those warmer temperatures!  It’s not only us though who get more active when the conditions change.  You may recall in previous issues we discovered how seasonality can affect bat behaviour, with churches providing a safe haven at those most vulnerable times.  In winter bats hibernate; but as night temperatures rise above 10OC, they will wake up and take advantage of increased insect activity.  They start emerging from April to May, and when they do, it offers an exciting opportunity to get involved in recording any you see flying over any space.

Illustration by Liz Vinson


Bats have unfortunately become an endangered species over past decades, with major population declines.  If you see a bat, its great news and hopefully a positive sign that they are recovering.  It can be hard to know this for certain, but that is where submitting any sightings can help.  At the Bat Conservation Trust (BCT), there is a National Bat Monitoring Programme (NBMP).  NBMP has been calculating population trends for over 20 years, with all records submitted by volunteers.  In fact, it’s all done on a voluntary basis and there are over a 1,000 people throughout the UK who help each year in carrying out bat surveys.  Some can be challenging, but the ‘Sunset/Sunrise’ survey is ideal for anyone.  It simply involves heading out at dusk or dawn, (or both) and spending an hour looking for bats flying overhead.  This can be done anytime from April to September; record the time, temperature and number of bats seen, and then send through the results.  

I’ve now left BCT, having taken up a Sustainability Project Coordinator post at Broomfield Hospital in Chelmsford.  The hospital does have a bat roost, and I am certainly still passionate about the bat world.  If you’d like to get involved with the NBMP, please do email BCT’s dedicated team nbmp@bats.org.uk or look at their website www.bats.org.uk/pages/nbmp.html

Happy monitoring!

David Jackson